2016 Minimum Wage Increases

Effective January 1, 2016, eleven states will increase their minimum wages. The federal minimum wage was last changed in 2009 and many states follow the lead of the federal standard. Other states have implemented aggressive action to account for cost of living, cost of wages and desire for labor market competitiveness that are unique to their states. Many of the minimum wage increases that will be implemented in 2016 are part of a multi-year staggered approach to achieving a minimum wage target. Some of the existing posters already have the multi-year staggered rates on them. In those cases the current poster is still valid. Where the current poster does not reflect the new rate, Labor Law Center LLC will be issuing new minimum wage posters. The eleven known states that will be implementing minimum wage increases in January 2016 include: STATE CURRENT MINIMUM WAGE NEW MINIMUM WAGE Alaska $8.75 $9.75 Arkansas $7.50 $8.00 California $9.00 $10.00 Connecticut $9.15 $9.60 Hawaii... More...

Sunnyvale Minimum Wage in 2015 is $10.30

Effective January 1, 2015 the Sunnyvale, CA minimum wage is $10.30 per hour. Several California cities including San Francisco, San Jose and Richmond have increased the municipal minimum wage higher than the California state minimum wage of $9.00 per hour.  Beginning January 1, 2016 the Sunnyvale minimum wage will increase annually, based on the cost of living. The City Council approved the ordinance to create a minimum wage requiring employers who maintain a place of business in Sunnyvale or perform any work or services within the city limits to pay employees at least $10.30 per hour. Employees who perform at least 2 hours of work per week in Sunnyvale must be paid the minimum wage. The measure was approved on October 28, 2014. The Sunnyvale, CA minimum wage applies to both full-time and part-time employees, regardless of age. Employees under the age of 18 are still entitled to the minimum rate of $10.30 per hour. Nationwide, Sunnyvale joins a number... More...

Alaska Minimum Wage for 2015 is $8.75

Effective February 24, 2015 the Alaska minimum wage increases from $7.75 to $8.75 per hour. The next scheduled increase is on January 1, 2016 when the AK minimum wage rises to $9.75 per hour. The increase passed as Ballot Measure 3 in November, 2014. Originally it was scheduled to go into effect on January 1, 2015. However, under state law, the earliest date the measure could go into effect is 90 days after the election results were certified, or February 24, 2015. Proponents of the Alaska minimum wage increase had hoped to get it on an earlier ballot, in August 2014, but failed. The measure was one of three initiatives delayed from the August primary ballot to the November 2014 election. The Alaska minimum wage increase is expected to affect 16,000+ workers with an estimated 10,000 additional workers indirectly affected. With Alaska, there are now more than 22 states with higher minimum wages than the federal rate, of $7.25 per... More...

Illinois Ban the Box Law

A new Illinois Ban the Box law that went into effect on January 1, 2015 prohibits employers from asking about an employee’s criminal background on applications or during the early part of the selection and recruiting process. The “Job Opportunities for Qualified Applicants Act” was signed by Governor Pat Quinn in July 2014. It prevents employers or their agents from inquiring about an applicant’s criminal history until after the applicant’s qualifications have been reviewed. In essence, this IL Ban the Box law requires employers to consider applicants regardless of their criminal history, but still allows employers to reject a candidate during the background check phase. Employers are not allowed to inquire about an applicant’s criminal history until after an interview, and after a conditional offer of employment has been made. Legal experts hope that this will encourage employers to overlook an applicant’s criminal history when the crimes occurred long ago, involved a youthful offender or when there were extenuating circumstances. The... More...

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