Idaho Lunch and Break Law

Recently, I’ve been reviewing the state laws related to lunches, breaks and other work hour issues. It may be of interest to note that Idaho does not have any specific state laws on the books related to meal or rest breaks for workers in that state. Even though it is the case that Idaho does not have any specific state laws, there are several applicable federal regulations. Federal Law does not mandate specific breaks or meal periods, but it does give guidance as to whether or not an employee should be paid during these times. Short breaks, those that are usually 20 minutes or less, should be counted as hours worked. True “meal periods” are usually 30 minutes or more, and do not need to be paid as work time. For this to be the case, however, the worker must be completely relieved of his or her duties during the meal break. If the employee is still required to do... More...

State of Nebraska Labor Laws

The Nebraska labor laws contain quite a few provisions designed to protect workers, provide safe workplaces, and generally provide standards for a variety of employment issues. In this blog entry I’ll give you a brief overview of some of these laws. Nebraska employees should be glad to know that the state enforces of a variety of standards designed to maintain a safe, healthful and hazard-free workplace. Standards exist to regulate all kinds of workplace hazards, from the use of various chemicals to scaffolding and power equipment. Workplace health and safety laws also set out requirements for employee bathrooms and other such facilities. Employers may be inspected and fined if they do not meet these standards. Another regulation in the Nebraska labor laws that may be of interest is the lunch and break law. Nebraska employees in certain industries who work at least 8 hours consecutively must be given a 30 minute duty-free, unpaid break. Employers are not allowed to require... More...

State Lunch and Break Law Requirements in Maine

In researching current lunch and break laws in various states, I learned that Maine is one of 19 states that has a specific regulation in this area. If a Maine employee has worked at least six consecutively in a given day, he or she must be given a 30 minute unpaid break. For this break to qualify, the worker must be completely relieved of his or her duties. If an employee must do a small task, such as answering the phone, it cannot qualify as a unpaid break. This statute applies to all workers regardless of age. There are a few exceptions written into the state law. For example, if taking this 30 minute unpaid rest break will cause danger to “property, life, public safety or health,” then the break is not required. The break is also not required in businesses where three or fewer employees are on duty at a time and in situations where employees are allowed to... More...

State of Alaska Lunch and Break Law

I find that employers and employees alike are often interested to know what laws apply to the lunches and breaks that workers may take. In Alaska, the state law only regulates the meal breaks for employees under the age of 18. State law mandates that employees ages 14 to 17 be given a 30 minute meal break if they have worked five hours or more. This may be an unpaid break. While Alaska law does not have any lunch and break provisions for workers 18 and over, Alaskans are covered by applicable federal rules in this area. You might be interested to know that federal law does not mandate specific breaks or meal periods, but it does give guidance as to whether or not an employee should be paid during these times. Short breaks, those that are usually 20 minutes or less, should be counted as hours worked. Genuine “meal periods” are usually 30 minutes or more, and do not... More...

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